Research Question 4: Critical Challenges

What do you see as the key challenges that European schools will face during the next 5 years?

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Compose your entries like this:
  • Challenge Name. Add your ideas here, with few sentences of description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!

  • The demand for personalized learning is not adequately supported by current technology or practices.The increasing demand for education that is customized to each student's unique needs is driving the development of new technologies that provide more learner choice and control and allow for differentiated instruction, but there remains a gap between the vision and the tools needed to achieve it. The notion that one-size-fits-all teaching methods are neither effective nor acceptable for today's diverse students is generally accepted among school educators. agree - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Nov 1, 2013 agree - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 We need to be careful in our definition of personalised learning. I prefer to think about 'pathways that are more flexible'. It is neither feasible nor desirable to try an identify unique needs for each student as soon as they enter school. Much of what happens in school is about socialisation and about learning to do things together. But of course as a student progresses, their own personality emerges and the goal should be to inculcate 'learning to learn' skills, so that the student becomes more confident and autonomous as they progress through their 12 years of schooling. In that context, 'personalised' in the future might mean that we cease to teach students in age cohort groups, and that taking of competence-based tests might be left to choice, rather than everyone sitting the same test on the same day. If we can define learning outcomes, then the pathways to reaching them should be flexibly adjustable - for me that should be the medium term goal of personalisation in a schools context. If schools are doing their job well, then outside of formal settings, students will follow many personal interests, enabled by the learning skills honed in their school setting. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 27, 2013 I think that personalisation is too identified with a process of 'matching' content to learner needs or preference without enough attention being paid to learner agency. Control is key - learning 'feels' personalised if the learner has a sense of control of the process or of the environment. This is where technology can contribute! - anne.looney anne.looney Nov 4, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 I'm not confident with current technological implementations that claim to be able to "personalise" learning. Most such applications base their student modelling on some quasi-theoretical stuff like "learning styles" and just offer more of the same to learners instead of making sure that different ways of learning are properly taught. Besides, modelling the information to be taught is not an easy task. It might be feasible in mathematics, for example, but harder is areas where one is after developing skills like problem solving or critical thinking. I think "personalisation" could rather take place through interest-based teaching; grouping learners better according to their level, and other "soft" means that teachers are good at diagnosing and coming up with. - Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 Personalization for me has also everything to do with flexible, capable and self-confident teachers who are able and willing to accept/adapt to new chances and opportunities for their students to operate differently from normal/old teaching. This means also that schools must give the necessary freedom within /around the curriculum and assessment requirements. - guus guus Oct 30, 2013 Personalisation has been going round the houses for years - it's one of these cyclical things (a bit like learning styles, which I combined with personalisation for my PhD and firmly debunked their use as an effective personalisation mechanism). I still don't think people really know what personalisation is or how to do it - the one obvious example is streaming/setting by ability groups in schools, and many studies have shown this to not be especially effective or any better than mixed ability groups. I think with the relatively "new" area of learning analytics (not really new, but the amount of data we potentially now have access to *is* new) can help support personalisation for learners but we're still working out what user data is useful and how it's useful, both for institutes and for providing feedback to aid learners (also links to concerns about privacy and ownership/use of data - mentioned later on, on this page). - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 To personalisation, I prefer the concept of individuation: personalisation is generally the adaptation within limited a pre-defined set of options (the learner has to learn something that she is probably not interested in at the first place. The precondition for 'personalisation' is that the learner accepts the institutional frame, the curriculum, the asymmetry of power relationships within the institution. Individuation is about a technology that contributes to the construction of one's identity. It starts from the individual, not the curriculum. It is not about 'personalising' the teaching of a discipline, but about empowering learners as active contributors to their community and society. - Serge Serge Oct 30, 2013 - Agree with Serge - Jean-Pierre.Berthet Jean-Pierre.Berthet Nov 3, 2013 Agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 Personalized learning is a very important concept in education as we strive to meet the needs of all students and prepare them for the challenges in the 21st century. In my opinion, Technology helps engaging and effective learning experiences, which can be differentiated for particular learners or personalized, which combines paced and tailored learning with flexibility in content to fit the interests and prior experience of each learner. As a community of educators we need to explore and answer how we can achieve this. - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • Education is moving to complexity and system thinking. 'The reform in thinking is a key anthropological and historical problem. This implies a mental revolution of considerably greater proportions than the Copernican revolution. Never before in the history of humanity have the responsibilities of thinking weighed so crushingly on us.'Edgar Morin. Thanks to technologies at hand, we have the opportunity to create meaningful learning experiences in relation to the education to complexity and system thinking. The issue is not just about accessing, personalised or not, to contents, but the opportunity to educate all citizens to complexity and system thinking, something essential if we want to educate citizens able to make informed decisions in a complex and interconnected world. Thanks to technologies such as the semantic web, big data, modelling, etc. we can create the experimental conditions in all dimensions of initial education to educate learners to complex and system thinking: "We need a kind of thinking that reconnects that which is disjointed andcompartmentalized, that respects diversity as it recognizes unity, and that tries to discern interdependencies. We need a radical thinking (which gets tothe root of problems), a multidimensional thinking, and an organizational orsystemic thinking. Edgar Morin. - Serge Serge Oct 30, 2013 (apologies for adding this entry at the top, but I can't take the risk to have this issue overlooked if placed at the bottom :-). Agree and thanks for putting it to the top. We live in a complex world and everyone will need to be capable not only of complex / expert thinking but also complex communication - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 very much agree - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • Schools must address the increased blending of formal and informal learning. Traditional lectures and subsequent testing are still dominant learning vehicles in schools. In order for students to get a well-rounded education with real world experience, they must also engage in more informal in-class activities as well as experience learning outside the classroom. In most schools, students are not encouraged to do this, nor to experiment and take risks with their learning, but new models are finding their way into practice. The “flipped classroom,” for example, uses educational materials on the Internet as a primary content strategy. New concepts and material are initially studied outside of school, thus preserving class time to refine mastery with discussions, collaborations with classmates, problem solving, and experimentation. The approach is not a panacea, and designing an effective blended learning model is key, but the growing success of the many non-traditional alternatives to schools that are using more informal approaches indicates that this challenge is being confronted. agree- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 Agree - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 Agree - tszmarta tszmarta Nov 3, 2013 Agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013agree - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • Despite a range of national and EU wide media literacy initiatives, research shows that the levels of knowledge and skills in children and teenagers are not as adequate as previously anticipated, especially for the dimensions of critical and participatory literacy. Yet rapid developments in the digital media environment have put increasing pressure on individuals to balance the advantages with potential risks of the information society including digital exclusion, consumer detriment, low participation and growing inequality. Among the factors which have contributed to the stagnation of media literacy skills is the lack of interface between multiple stakeholders of media literacy initiatives, positioned in a wider and supportive policy context. Collaborative approaches to (media) education need to be developed and encouraged which embrace the research community, educator promoting media-related learning across informal and formal learning contexts, policy makers and regulatory bodies, professionals in the field of media, communication and technology and media-oriented NGOs and citizen initiatives. - papaioannou.t papaioannou.t Oct 30, 2013 - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Agree, and would add that ePortfolios can be a key enabler - providing for a repository of work done by students in both formal and informal settings, and additionally, a place for students' critical reflection on learning and where material for assessment can be gathered together. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 ePortfolios interoperability is a key issue - Jean-Pierre.Berthet Jean-Pierre.Berthet Nov 3, 2013 I agree that more work should be done around "blended learning models" in order to keep learners engaged and add value for the fact that they have to spend so many hours in school. I'm glad that Flipped Classroom made people to think & talk about this, although I am not necessarily sure that watching a lecture online is the best alternative (it's still the same sage on the stage-concept). In any case, I think more FORMAL learning activities should take place out of school in order to make learners understand that skills taught in school make sense in the real world. - Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 This is an important point. A number of countries are still anchored in the practice of one classroom, one teacher, one hour - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 Agree - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013 The lack of technoliteracy leads to the inability of citizens to have an informed opinion on current technological trends and influence the choices made by business leaders and give an informed mandate to policymakers. Critical technoliteracy: beyond computer and digital literacy. Concepts of digital and computer literacy grew out of the need to develop the skills and competencies of those using ICT. The European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) is one example. Other literacy definitions focus on the ability to search, review, compile and publish digital information (see the European Key Competence Framework). Yet, these definitions only address the tip of the iceberg of required literacies to make sense of technological developments. We need to develop critical technoliteracy i.e. "the need to comprehend and make use of proliferating high-technologies, and the political economy that drives them, towards furthering radical democratic understandings and transformations of our worlds." (Reconstructing Technoliteracy: A Multiple Literacies Approach, Richard Kahn and Douglas Kellner). To use the words of Edgar W. Jenkins (1997) "Who benefits, who loses? Who pays? What are the social, environmental, personal, or other consequences of following, or not following, a particular course of action? What alternative courses of action are available? These questions are not always, and perhaps only rarely, going to yield agreed answers, but addressing them is arguably fundamental to any educational program that claims to advance technological literacy for all." To these views, I would add the need for students and citizens to have an understanding of systems and architectures (system thinking), and their genesis. - Serge Serge Nov 1, 2013
  • Learning that incorporates real life experiences is not occurring enough and is undervalued when it does take place. This challenge is an important one in schools, because it can greatly impact the engagement of students who are seeking some connection between the world as they know it exists outside of school, and their experiences in school that are meant to prepare them for that world. Use of project-based learning practices that incorporate real-life experiences, technology and tools that are already familiar to students, and mentoring from community members are examples of practices that can bring the real world into the classroom. Practices like these may help retain students in school and prepare them for further education, careers, and citizenship in a way that traditional practices are failing to do. - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Agree, and would add that assessment systems need to change to accommodate the processes and outcomes of project-based learning - mindful of the adage that 'what gets measured gets done'. Intrinsic motivation is insufficient - the 'system' must value and reward the desired learning practices. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 I agree, and strongly agree with Jim's point about assessment systems - Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 Fully agree!! - u.simmetsberger u.simmetsberger Oct 30, 2013 agree- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 agree - links in somewhat with what I wrote under the 'geolocation' page (under RQ1) about instilling a sense of place and feeling of community - these can be drawn out in formal education e.g. culture, language, geography, art/design etc - but am not sure this is done in enough schools [[user:elizabeth.fitzgerald|1383155274] I would like to complement Learning that incorporates real life experiences, with learning that has an impact on real life: how what we learn in school can have an impact on society? - Serge Serge Oct 30, 2013 Agree - tszmarta tszmarta Nov 3, 2013 Agree - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 Agree, and want to suggest that what teachers and schools perceive as 'real life' may not actually be the 'real life' of students. - anne.looney anne.looney Nov 4, 2013
  • Many activities related to learning and education take place outside the walls of the classroom and thus are not part of traditional learning metrics. Students can take advantage of learning material online, through games and programs they may have on systems at home, and through their extensive — and constantly available — social networks. The experiences that happen in and around these venues are difficult to tie back to the classroom, as they tend to happen serendipitously and in response to an immediate need for knowledge, rather than being related to topics currently being studied in school. agree - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Agree, and would add that students could be encouraged to keep a diary/ePortfolio of such activities with the opportunity to have this assessed for credits. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013. Fully agree - they will hardly ever work for nothing... - u.simmetsberger u.simmetsberger Oct 30, 2013 Most learning happens out of school...- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 That's the way it is, so schools have to find their own new niche for their raison d'etre ;) More seriously, if recognition of prior knowledge and assessment of skills&competences were not linked to the seat-time in school, this should not be a problem. [[user:Riina_Vuorikari|1383068674] I think that the goals and contents of education should be integrally in conjunction with the world outside so that there's no problem in implementing the skills learned and knowledge adopted (outside classroom) in the learning activities at school. Does it make any sense to, at school, learn things that are utterly and completely separated from the real life outside school? - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 True - tszmarta tszmarta Nov 3, 2013 outdoor education is in keeping with the educational needs of today’s young people as they grapple with considerable changes in a rapidly changing world. This kind of education provide meaningful contextual experiences for students, preparing them to live and work to sustain the cultural and ecological integrity of the places they inhabit - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013
  • New models of education are bringing unprecedented competition to the traditional models of education. Across the board, institutions are looking for ways to provide a high quality of service and more opportunities for learning. MOOCs are at the forefront of these discussions, and have opened the doorway to entirely new ways of thinking about online learning. Primary and secondary institutions are latecomers to distance education in most cases, but competition from specialized charter schools and for-profit providers has called attention to the needs of today’s students, especially those at risk. USC Hybrid High School in downtown Los Angeles is a good example; its mission is to graduate 100% of its students to be socially and academically prepared for success in college and the workplace. To that end, the school incorporates a flexible schedule, highly integrated online components, and personalized learning plans to keep students engaged and focused on success. - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 These models are less evident in a European context, where schools remain largely under the public control of Education Ministries. However, 'Charter/Academy' schools are gaining some traction, particularly in UK and Scandanavian countries appear to allow a greater degree of flexibility that enables the emergence of entirely new models of schooling. Examples, include the Hellerup School in Copenhagen http://www.theguardian.com/smart-class-2025/denmark-hellerup-schoop-learning-by-doing and the ESSA Academy in UK
    http://www.essaacademy.org/ - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 Alternative schools have existed for a long, long time and they have not "outsmarted" the traditional school model. So my guess is that new models will be invented, but they at the end won't change much for most of the learners. However, that does not mean that it won't be important for some of the learners. I especially like to hear about USC hybrid high school since it really makes difference for those few who attend it. Actually, Finland has one of the lowest drop out rates in the EU for early school leavers, it's a lot thanks to flexible learning arrangements. Secondly, school sector will also feel the "unbundling" effect of education where some of the services could be outsourced. Again, an example from Finland, we have lots of remote areas (e.g. Lapland) with small schools. Kids are still offered language choices through distance learning means in schools. - Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 agree with Riina, the new models of education you envisage are still rare cases and mostly in Norther Europe! [[user:stefania.aceto|1383127200] Yes but the educational landscape is very resistant to change. "Formal education – whether at school, college or university level – is a super-stable system, with an interlocking set of conventions for teaching, curriculum development, recruitment, examination and accreditation that resist external change.” - as quoted in THES (http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/the-crowds-impact-could-stretch-to-funding/2007788.article), from our OU Innovating Pedagogy 2013 report (http://www.open.ac.uk/blogs/innovating/). It's likely that many of these new systems, such as MOOCs, will supplement rather than replace traditional forms of learning, although agreed the potential for them to reach out to those who might not otherwise have the opportunity to learn, is incredible and could have far-reaching impact we can only currently guess at.[[user:elizabeth.fitzgerald|1383155274]Ongoing professional development needs to be valued and integrated into the culture of the schools. There is immense pressure placed on teachers to incorporate emerging technologies and new media in their classrooms and curriculum. All too often, when schools mandate the use of a specific technology, teachers are left without the tools (and often skills) to effectively integrate the new capabilities into their methods. The results are that the new investments are underutilized, not used at all, or used in a way that mimics an old process rather than innovating new processes that may be more engaging for students. - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 A whole school approach and the development of a teamwork ethic is essential. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 I agree with Jim, school is more like a sports team where the value comes from playing together. That kind of attitude also take lots of burden off the teacher's shoulder. Giving them ideas of doing team work with another teacher who has those skills could be a win-win. Great examples exist of involving learners with such in the teaching process, too. - Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 Teacher education has to be in the focus to mke new technologies enter the classrooms!! - u.simmetsberger u.simmetsberger Oct 30, 2013. agree - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 Indeed, teacher education is conditional for success, but that is not always recognized by schools - Pieter.Swager Pieter.Swager Oct 30, 2013. I completely agree on Jim and Riina about the whole school approach. Teacher teams and co-teaching is already used in Finland when differentiation is needed, in phenomenon based learning and in international projects. It's the teacher-centered one-way education that maintains the idea of the omnipotent teacher who is the expert in everything. Fortunately, we're moving towards the change of teacher's role to a guide and a moderator rather than the know-it-all who never makes mistakes. This entails the change in students' roles. They can actively contribute to the learning process by bringing their own knowledge and skills for the use of the whole class. So, in the shools of the future, students can be teachers as well as teachers can be learners. - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 Inspectorates etc. should see to it that all schools and teacher training institutions organize their own way of changing the culture of the school in the above described way. Vision papers and scenarios - discussed with all stakeholders - could be useful tools for this. - guus guus Oct 30, 2013 The Survey of Schools: ICT and Education (essie.eun.org) found that teachers' training needs are poorly met (I exaggerate a little) and that they spend a lot (70% from memory) of their own time on spontaneous self-directed learning about technology in their own time, a credit to the profession. Social and peer networks are under-exploited as is online Continuing Professional Development. - roger.blamire roger.blamire Oct 30, 2013 Is the initial statement "New models of education are bringing unprecedented competition to the traditional models of education" fully accurate? What is really "new" in the so-called "new models of education"? What do networked digital technologies bring that couldn't exist without them? Peer learning? The first systematic approach to peer tutoring dates from the 18th century and is credited to Andrew Bell, the superintendent of the Military Male Asylum at Egmore, England (Goodlad et. al.)! Distance and Open Learning? Not exactly! User Generated Content? When I was a student at the university, many 'polycopiés' (lecture notes) were published by students! As Peter Childers and Paul Delany wrote in Wired World, Virtual Campus: Universities and the Political Economy of Cyberspace, "Just as the printing press spelled the demise of monastic institutions and ushered in the modern university, cyberspace may dissolve the bricks and mortar campuses of today into a de-centered knowledge culture, a networked "virtual" site of intellectual exchange that renders obsolete old ivied quadrangles as well as institutional and political borders, creating something akin to H.G. Wells's vision of a 'World Brain.'" It is the emergence of what Mark Eisenstadt coined as the era of knowledge media, after that of mass media. Schools in their current forms are probably obsolete. Yet it is still the place where miracles happen: Mexico has found a new heroine: A 12-year-old math whiz from a state plagued by drug violence who was dubbed "The Next Steve Jobs" by a US magazine (http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/girl-dubbed-the-next-steve-jobs-captivates-mexico-440237?ndtv_rhs). According to Sergio Juarez Correa, her teacher, the source of the miracle was minimally invasive education! I Couldn't have provided a better description of the idea behind scaffolding! Yet, many instances of the use of technology in education might not be described as minimally invasive... - Serge Serge Nov 1, 2013 Agree - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 We are challenged by a fundamental change of paradigm in learning and education. It’ll contain change from transference of information to building of knowledge, from learning content to learning skills, from teachers-centred learning to learner-centred learning and from learning separate subjects to phenomenon-based learning. As long as these changes aren’t implemented in the core curricula there’s little hope of real change. We don’t go towards the change by adopting new technology. We have to adopt new ways of learning and a new understanding of knowledge. Instead of building new structures of curators and sensors, protective walls and prohibitions, it’s vitally important to learn skills and know-how to cope with exponentially increasing amounts of information created every day. There are already technologies that support new pedagogies and new ones are developed every day. However, the understanding of inevitable change in education has to rise from re-definition of knowledge, not from random implementations of modern technologies. - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 I'm afraid that the connection between changes of paradigm in education and technological change is overstated (reading John Dewey should suffice to close the argument). For example in the statement " There are already technologies that support new pedagogies." First, 'new' pedagogies are not that new (c.f. Montessori & Co) and the role played by technologies is more at the discourse or marketing level than in reality. Let's take the flipped classroom: this was possible with paper and pencils. No need for interactive whiteboards or video cameras. The main element of a flipped classroom is not the video watched at home (it could be a text book read at the library) but the more relevant use of classroom time, something that good teachers have practised for ages. - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013
  • Simply staying organized and current presents a challenge in a world where information, software tools, and devices proliferate at the rate they do today. New developments in technology are exciting and their potential for improving quality of life is enticing, but it can be overwhelming to attempt to keep up with even a few of the many new tools that are released. User-created content is exploding, giving rise to information, ideas, and opinions on all sorts of interesting topics, but following even some of the hundreds of available authorities means sifting through a mountain of information on a weekly or daily basis. There is a greater need than ever for effective tools and filters for finding, interpreting, organizing, and retrieving the data that is important to us. - I think this holds true for teachers in particulary, as they are potentially under pressure from expectant students, teachers and heads of school all at the same time- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 A whole school approach can provide the necessary digital strategy and a context for greater stability from year to year. Random, or ad-hoc desisions should not be a feature of the school year. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013. Keeping in mind what is important for a school is important and that's where a school's mission statement is important. I hope it will not include being updated with the latests internet fab, in that case the school should reconsider its mission...- Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 I agree with Riina. What is important is that schools are updated with what is useful to their mission not "trendy" as such. - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 In this context the role of educational curatorship is important - knowing what to use and when is no longer a simple task. Teachers are already creating informal networks via Twitter and Learnist for example, of trusted professionals who act in an informal yet important curator role - anne.looney anne.looney Nov 4, 2013 Organizations are challenged to ensure quality while engaging in the use of rapidly changing, ever-evolving technologies. As new information and new technologies are readily available, at the fingertips of learners, educational institutions must find ways to intervene and remain a part of the relationship between the technology and the student. These organizations must make wise, up-to-date decisions when external image arrow-10x10.png in and implementing technologies. To do so, they must conduct extensive research and regard technologies and their potential applications from all angles. Collaborations between institutions in the exploration of emerging technology provide them with opportunities to exchange ideas, success stories, obstacles, and develop best practices. Agree. Collaboration within schools, between schools and through networks both national and international (e.g., European Schoolnet) are essential to underpinning good, implementable strategies, and the required CPD. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Nov 1, 2013 . Agree - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 3, 2013 - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013Agree - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • Too often it is education’s own practices that limit broader uptake of new technologies. Resistance to change simply reflects comfort with the status quo. In many cases, experimentation with or piloting of innovative applications of technologies are often seen as outside the role of teacher or school leader, and thus discouraged. Changing these processes will require major shifts in attitudes as much as they will in policy. Strongly agree - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 agree, I would also add that technology and the related applications/tools emerging are still considered with a fun-like connotation by the majority of teachers and schoolheads and not valued for their learning potential. the subjective vision of school leaders has a role even when the external image arrow-10x10.png of technology is promoted by the Ministry (as often technological choices are in the hands of single schools)
    - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 - william.jenkins william.jenkins Oct 21, 2013 An understanding of how new technologies get adopted is a key challenge and "The Curse of Expertise" with senior managers can be a challenge (as we have seen with other sectors - music, retail, gaming, photography etc). This report highlights what some of the issues are and is designed to help educators understand how new technology gets adopted http://www.tech-stories.co.uk/reports/Technology_in_FE.pdf
  • We are not using digital media for formative assessment the way we could and should. Assessment is an important driver for educational practice and change, and over the last years we have seen a welcome rise in the use of formative assessment in educational practice. However, there is still an assessment gap in how changes in curricula and new skill demands are implemented in education; schools do not always make necessary adjustments in assessment practices as a consequence of these changes. Simple applications of digital media tools, like webcams that allow non-disruptive peer observation, offer considerable promise in giving teachers timely feedback they can use. I think learners themselves should start thinking how they could use those tools to get better feedback for their own learning. - Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 Fully agree! We tend to see assessment tools as means for teachers while they should be simply considered as tools to learn about learning. Assessment is one instance of meta-learning. We need to put more effort on the learning about learning technologies learners can use — and their carers. “One had to cram all this stuff into one's mind for the examinations, whether one liked it or not. This coercion had such a deterring effect on me that, after I had passed the final examination, I found the consideration of any scientific problems distasteful to me for an entire year.” Albert Einstein - Serge Serge Oct 30, 2013. The main challenge for ICT-enabled innovation for learning is the assessment! - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 Strong agreement with this idea. Too much attention has been paid to the digital content debate and not enough to the digital assessment, feedback and reporting debate! The 'capture and share' impulse has huge potential to represent learning. - anne.looney anne.looney Nov 4, 2013
  • We need to deal with Issues of data protection. All the great potential of digital media, learning analytics and big data also holds risks and reservations regarding proper use of data and data protection. -- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Agree - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 agree - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 It is also a great opportunity! - Serge Serge Oct 30, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 2, 2013 agree! - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013 Sometime it’s hard to tell whether you are the user or the product - claus.gregersen claus.gregersen Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • Initial teacher education needs updating to encompass digital learning. A majority of students entering teacher education colleges are highly digitally literate in a personal capacity. However, their ability to develop these skills in a way that supports teaching practice and the learning practices of their students must feature strongly in the college programmes that prepare the next generation of teachers. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 29, 2013 Yes, agree.- Riina_Vuorikari Riina_Vuorikari Oct 29, 2013 agree - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 Easier said than done. In Finnish teacher education the colleges/universities are equipped with the newest technology, but there are very few lecturers or professors able to really use the technologies and applications in a pedagogically meaningful way. - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 I cannot agree more, Tiina! Finding pedagogical ways of using technology is very difficult and slow, and needs practice in real contexts. When it works, it seems so easy, nobody cares too much about how it was made to work. Universities often do not provide real context but fill the mind of pre-service teachers with theories that are far from viable . Overcoming student resistance to new approaches when you are trying to do something you are not completely sure of takes time and effort apart from courage and careful planning. Using technology is one thing, and using it in the class, quite another.- nuria.desalvador nuria.desalvador Nov 2, 2013 Strongly agree! Agree strongly - the young people entering teacher education may be digital natives, but the teacher educators are not ! - anne.looney anne.looney Nov 4, 2013- Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 Agree - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013- stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013 Is the problem that teachers don't know how to use technologies or that they don't know how students learn (not to say that they don't know how to teach!)? If teachers had the inquiry minds they are supposed to 'teach' pupils and students, then they should be in a position to explore with them new practices, so event if they are not properly trained during their initial teacher training, they would be in a position to learn with/from their pupils and students. The problem is not that they don't know how to use technologies, but that their mental framework is very far away from inquiry. Adding lectures and even a bit of practice during initial teacher education won't change anything to it. What needs to be changed is not their skill set (the easy part) but their mind set! - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013
  • There is a mainstreaming gap in education. It's easy and self-reinforcing to work with motivated and well-equipped schools where conditions for innovation and change are fertile, and then to generalise from them what works for the majority of schools (Mike Trucano wrote interestingly on this 'Matthew Effect' (http://blogs.worldbank.org/edutech/matthew-effect-educational-technology). However their culture and attitudes may not be the same. Systemic change is a huge challenge. A small step forward has perhaps been shown in iTEC's Eduvista (http://eduvista.eun.org) toolkit where after experiences in 2000 classrooms, the emphasis has settled on a whole process beginning with self-review, identifying trends and challenges, opportunities, and only then considering how and which technologies may contribute to change. - roger.blamire roger.blamire Oct 30, 2013 I agree that systemic change is a huge challenge. See a framework for effective policies and strategies to mainstream ICT-enabled learning innovations (based on 7 case reports from Europe and Asia) at the JRC-IPTS report (http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=6362) - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • Challenges are uneven across Europe. In many countries there are still fundamental equipment and infrastructure challenges that have to be met if any change is to take place. The Survey of Schools (essie.eun.org) found that ratios varied from more than 1 computer per student to 23:1 depending on the country. In others, the infrastructure is there but the challenge is low teacher use of it. - roger.blamire roger.blamire Oct 30, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 2, 2013
  • As we are integrating Internet based activities and services into education settings the need for a faster and broader Internet increases. Possibly is one of the key challenges to reach to mainstream some of the ideas seen in this project. Without this, very little can be done with external image arrow-10x10.png, web based services, etc etc... - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Oct 30, 2013 True! - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013
  • Schools need to be seen as learning organisations. A number of issues addressed above could be subsumed under the concept of schools as learning organisations, learning communities. The move towards more individualisation (individuation!) of learning, like with the flipped classroom, has a corollary, that is schools as a whole behaving as learning organisations. Teachers learn while teaching, pupils teach while learning (!), pupils from multiple levels of competency work together with teachers towards common achievements that could be unique to their schools, so they would be able to say: this is what we have learned together — rather than just individually. What knowledge have we produced that is meaningful to us and to others? As John Dewey wrote in Moral Principles in Education "Imagine forty children all engaged in reading the same books, and in preparing and reciting the same lessons day after day [...] There is no opportunity for each child to work out something specifically his own, which he may contribute to the common stock, while he, in turn, participates in the productions of others". - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013 Schools as democraticorganisations. There is a profound discrepancy between the values taught in schools and those experienced by pupils (and parents, and teachers!). Not much has changed since John Dewey wrote " And how many who speak glowingly of the large services of the public schools to a democracy of free and self-reliant men affect a cynical and even vehement opposition to the “self-government of schools”! These would not have the children learn to govern themselves and one another, but would have the masters rule them, ignoring the fact that this common practice in childhood may be a foundation for that evil condition in adult society where the citizens are arbitrarily ruled by political bosses." (ibid.). Instead of teaching moral and ethics as an academic discipline (like the French Minister of Education wishes to), let's revive schools as democratic public places living by high moral and ethical standards. Have a go at http://www.educationrevolution.org/store/product/democratic-education/ - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 We need to treat schools as learning organizations. Pupils and students are moving (slowly) from the right column of the balance sheet to the left. In accounting, the left side of the balance sheet represents the assets while the costs and liabilities are on the right side. While there are discussions among enlightened businesses to put on the left side of the balance sheet the intellectual and social capital of their employees, pupils and students tend to remain in the costs and liabilities column. This has to change, and it has already started. How? Looking at the number of initiatives where learners are not just 'consumers' of knowledge, but where each child seizes the opportunity "to work out something specifically his own, which he may contribute to the common stock, while he, in turn, participates in the productions of others" (John Dewey, Moral Principles in Education). This is achievable through authentic learning, real science (not just repeating year after year the same exercises) addressing real world problems at each level of education. This is of course closely connected with treating schools as learning organisations, something started some time ago in business. - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 - anna.hoberg anna.hoberg Nov 3, 2013 We need to focus more on deeper learning and understanding. Today's school's are taking in to many themes in their subjects, there is no evidence on PISA results saying that schools with 60-80 themes within a subject are better than 18-20 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 [Editor: MOVED TO RQ4 CHALLENGES]
  • A redefinition of the value chain of education is taking place. Sorry to use such an economic concept but, in fact, what we can see in our country is a whole redefinition of actors, roles played by them, content they offer, outcomes expected... As digital content (OER, digital textbooks...) is more present in the market and in schools, who produces content (not only traditional publishing houses, but startups, groups of teachers, schools...), who buy it (families, administrations, schools), how this content is used (or licensed...), how it is offered to the society (via online central catalogue, and/or directly from publishers to market and/or traditional book shops...), how it is distributed to schools and students, etc etc etc The different choices made during this process of redefinition of actors in the value chain of education will make possibly a difference in the medium term: some doors will open or will be closed, and that will affect the work done at classroom level. For example, some elearning platforms that could be used for distribution of contents till the classroom are more project based orientated than others... so technology choices are going to be crucial in classroom performance possibilities... To make this redefinition smoothly and the less painful for everybody, it is necessary that decission makers are very well informed. - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 2, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013Agree - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • There are health issues related to the high exposure to electronic devices. Several educational stakeholders express their concerns about students’ and teachers' health (e.g., Visual Display Terminal syndrome), with regard to their high exposure to electronic devices such as netbooks and smartphones during the school day which makes it essential that the day is planned with physical exercise and hands-on activities in between screen work. - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013

New challenges moved here from RQ2:

  • We need to address the current asymmetry in the type of technologies developed for education: we have many teaching technologies (LMS, electronic whiteboards, OER, etc.) and much less authentic learning technologies. User Generated Context: Technology for Learners taking ownership of their learning environment — from cradle to grave. Even, most of ePortfolio implementations are institutionally centred. One evidence of this asymmetry is the fragmentation of the learning landscape and infrastructure, which is obvious when a pupil moves from one school to another or when studying at different institutions. Thanks to the rise of knowledge media, we have now many practices based on / leading to user generated contents. What we now need is technologies and practices leading to user generated contexts. Why not build a digital learning environment based on the MineCraft paradigm, i.e. using a technology accessible to everybody? Why should Moodle and the like be left into the hands of the teaching high priests? The issue is not just to make Moodle more open or to give students authoring accounts (to mimic what their teachers do?) but new tools, with which they would be empowered to design their own learning environment(s).
  • We need to make kids the architects of their collaborative learning environment(s). This is very different from the individualistic PLE, or the course-focused MOOC. It is more like a co-designed / co-constructed / co-operated open learning environment, some kind of self-generated learning context — autopoiesis. We could christen this new object COOLE (CO-constructed Open Learning Environment). Probably a major contributor to the development of the future OES (Open Education Space). A slightly more elaborated version of this entry: http://wp.me/p3TPZU-3b - Serge Serge Nov 2, 2013 - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013 This is what could be very exciting and would more genuinely reflect a shared and more equal relationship between students and teachers. - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - Jeroen.Bottema Jeroen.Bottema Nov 3, 2013 [Editor: This reads more like a challenges and has been moved to RQ4]

Moved here from RQ3, and combined with a similar challenge listed above -- DO NOT ADD TO VOTING:

  • We need to treat schools as learning organizations. Pupils and students are moving (slowly) from the right column of the balance sheet to the left. In accounting, the left side of the balance sheet represents the assets while the costs and liabilities are on the right side. While there are discussions among enlightened businesses to put on the left side of the balance sheet the intellectual and social capital of their employees, pupils and students tend to remain in the costs and liabilities column. This has to change, and it has already started. How? Looking at the number of initiatives where learners are not just 'consumers' of knowledge, but where each child seizes the opportunity "to work out something specifically his own, which he may contribute to the common stock, while he, in turn, participates in the productions of others" (John Dewey, Moral Principles in Education). This is achievable through authentic learning, real science (not just repeating year after year the same exercises) addressing real world problems at each level of education. This is of course closely connected with treating schools as learning organisations, something started some time ago in business. - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 - anna.hoberg anna.hoberg Nov 3, 2013 We need to focus more on deeper learning and understanding. Today's school's are taking in to many themes in their subjects, there is no evidence on PISA results saying that schools with 60-80 themes within a subject are better than 18-20 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 [Editor: MOVED TO RQ4 CHALLENGES]