Research Question 3: Key Trends

What trends do you expect to have a significant impact on the ways in which learning-focused institutions approach their core mission of teaching, learning, research, and service in European schools?

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  • Trend Name. Add your ideas here with a few of sentences description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!



  • The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is challenging us to revisit our roles as educators. Institutions must consider the unique value that schools add to a world in which information is everywhere, and generally free. In such a world, sense-making and the ability to assess the credibility of information are paramount. Mentoring and preparing students for the world in which they will live and work is again at the forefront. Schools have always been seen as critical paths to educational credentialing, but challenges from competing sources are redefining what these paths can look like. - agree - helga helga Oct 26, 2013Agree, but would also add that Ministries of Education, policy makers and those responsible for determining the schools curriculum and assessment systems must revisit their own thinking - too often we think of educators as those on the frontline in schools, but they can do little to change if the system itself is inflexible. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013 Very true! But this asks for longer term vision discussions between decision makers and unfortunately most politicians are not able/willing/daring to go for it and take real responsabilities. - guus guus Oct 30, 2013I agree. Also, education undoubtly isthe primary institutional context to support learning among children but it is often in informal learning contexts we can investigate where and how children and young people “practise’ their skills and competences. One more challenge technology has created for education is how to develop learning strategies to better utilise informal learning opportunities and forge links across in and out of school contexts. - papaioannou.t papaioannou.t Oct 30, 2013 yes very true - we need to look at how we effectively curate resources - or teach our pupils to become curators - and also the process of creating resources in the first place - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013This is an important key trend and I'm happy to say that Norway has opened up for the use of the internet during some exams. This is a step in the right direction and important if we want teachers to change what goes on in the classroom. - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Oct 31, 2013 Teacher and student must learn how to efficiently curate contents on the internet. - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 The role of teachers as curators of learning resources can be boosted by the internet. - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Nov 2, 2013 I agree. I think that Internet can help many teaching and learning approaches, such as inquiry learnig - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013 The gaining popularity for the changing role of teachers forces the late developers also to challenge themselves with new ideas, tools and methods. - tszmarta tszmarta Nov 3, 2013 Indeed the challenge now is not access to information / resources rather we need to develop learners sense of "criticality" as to the authenticity, credibility and suitability of these resources. They need to be able to create / contribute their own resources too which challenges them to be able to use a range of tools and work with a multitude of modalities for a range of different contexts. - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad
  • As the cost of technology drops and schools/municipalities revise and open up their access policies, it is becoming more common for students to bring their own mobile devices. A growing number of schools are launching “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) programs so that students can use the devices they already own in class. This is happening as a result of how BYOD impacts budgets; schools can spend less money on technology overall if they focus their efforts on equipping the students who cannot afford their own devices. The relative new interest in BYOD programs has been accompanied by an attitude shift as schoolteachers and staff better understand the capabilities of smartphones and other devices that, unfortunately, still remain banned on many school campuses. BYOD should be regarded with caution - otherwise we run the risk of 'device competition'...who has the bet smartphone/tablet etc. The idea of one-to-one is fine, but ideally it's the same 'one' for all students in a given class. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013. I see your point, but believe that schools should profit from the advantages BYOD can bring and try to cope with/neutralize any competition caused by different 'levels' of devices. - guus guus Oct 30, 2013 I agree with Jim. Besides, resistance of teachers or more generally from schools as institiutions has to be considered. On one side education could profit from the experience of the corporate sector, where BYOD is already a quite common phenomenon, to anticipate critical aspects linked to BYOD (like security issue, interoperability etc). On the other side, school education being considered a public good faces the challenge of equity.I am not aware of BYOD experiences in Southern European schools, maybe this is an already ongoing phenomenon in Norhern Europe? - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 - roger.blamire roger.blamire Oct 30, 2013 BYOD is now utilized in high schools in Norway and here it works well. There is the aspect of cost for some students but the schools should provide computers for those who need it. If the schools and the counties focus on infrastructure instead of providing computers to everyone, this will be of great help. To be able to teach in a class with different devices the teachers need to be know how to use technology! - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Oct 31, 2013 BYOD are - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013In most Danish schools the students are bringing both their laptop and smartphone and sometime also a tablet that’s connected via the schools infrastructure that must support 2-3 wifi connection pr student. - claus.gregersen claus.gregersen Nov 3, 2013 BYOD will the the key issue. - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 Agree to the trend, however, for reasons of practicality and security some degree of uniformity will probably be needed - oysteinjohannessen oysteinjohannessen Nov 2, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013 This is certainly a trend, yet it definetely widens the gap between "haves and have nots". - tszmarta tszmarta Nov 3, 2013 Agree that this is a trend and schools should embrace it as it could be a cost efficient way of enabling a 1:1 situation by capitalising on those that have their own device already. This means that schools should would only then have to provide devices to those who cannot afford them. To ensure some level of consistency schools could recommend a certain range of devices that are acceptable. We regularly get parents asking for advice on what devices they should buy. The school however would have to have a robust technical infrastructure capable of supporting a range of different devices and teachers would have to be very comfortable with working with this range of devices. - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 Yes, definitely a trend in European schools - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • Computers as we know them are in the process of a massive reinvention. The computer is smaller, lighter, and better connected than ever before, without the need for wires or bulky peripherals. In many cases, smart phones and other mobile devices are sufficient for basic computing needs, and only specialized tasks require a keyboard, large monitor, and a mouse. Mobiles are connected to an ecosystem of applications supported bytechnologies that can be downloaded and used instantly, for pennies. As the capabilities and interfaces of small computing devices improve, our ideas about when — or whether — a traditional computer is necessary are changing as well. Agree - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 Very much agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013
  • Education paradigms are shifting to include online learning, hybrid learning, and collaborative models. Students already spend much of their free time on the Internet, learning and exchanging new information — often via their social networks. Institutions that embrace face-to-face/online hybrid learning models have the potential to make use of the online skills learners have already developed independent of academia. Online learning environments have distinct advantages over physical campuses, including opportunities for greater collaboration while equipping students with stronger digital skills. Hybrid models, when designed and implemented successfully, enable students to travel to campus for some activities, while using the network for others, taking advantage of the best of both environments. - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Agree, but again what is critical to successful deployment is a curriculum that supports diversity in modes of learning and a school with a strong sense of digital purpose.- jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013.This is still a vision, at least in Southern European Schools (or even science fiction). Besides, we must be careful in differentiating between online skills to play chat navigate and online skills for learning which most children (and also teachers, I am afraid) do not have. - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 Agree, my experience is that students at third level are wonderful with FaceBook etc for personal use but are less inclined to work collaboratively online with a learning task. - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 [[user:stefania.bocconi|- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • Increasingly, students want to use their own technology for learning. As new technologies are developed at a more rapid and at a higher quality, there is a wide variety of different devices, gadgets, and tools from which to choose. Utilizing a specific device has become something very personal — an extension of someone’s personality and learning style — for example, the choice one makes between the iOS or the Android platforms. Students (and teachers) appreciate being able to give a presentation or conduct research with tools that are familiar and productive for them personally. As handheld technology continues to be ever more capable and more affordable, students often have access to more advanced equipment in their personal lives than at school. - this is also to be seen in connection with BYOD- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 But it means for schools that they have to give to students more responsability and opportunity to play a more important role in planning and realizing their own learning paths...- guus guus Oct 30, 2013 - Jeroen.Bottema Jeroen.Bottema Nov 3, 2013 yes - this, and the point above about educational paradigms shifting - both refer to seamless learning (also referred to below) - where learning crosses "seams" in our lives i.e. not just learning in schools, or at home, but when travelling/in transit, waiting for friends, whilst out shopping etc. - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 I agree, but our educational systems should be adapted. I Greece it is not permited to use these technologies at schools- ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013
  • Openness — concepts like open content, open data, and open resources, along with notions of transparency and easy access to data and information — is becoming a value. As authoritative sources lose their importance, there is need for more curation and other forms of validation to generate meaning in information and media. “Open” has become a term often applied in very different contexts. Often mistaken to mean “free,” open education advocates are working towards a common vision that defines “open” more broadly — not just free in economic terms, but educational materials that are freely copiable, freely remixable, and free of barriers to access, sharing, and educational use. What will become more important is the curating of sets of resources and the building of trust in curators (who can be teachers, publishers, others with a passion and interest) - teachers want to be able to rely on others to help them identify appropriate digital resources that are of assured high quality. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 agree- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 yes but I also think my earlier point about curation is important - lots of open and free resources are not necessarily of good quality - we need a way of assessing value and judgment - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Oct 30, 2013 Teachers have to transform their role from content providers to facilitators - Jean-Pierre.Berthet Jean-Pierre.Berthet Oct 31, 2013 At least I hope, that openness is becoming a stronger value year by year. I recognize that open teaching material is spread over a huge number of portals. It would add further value to have for example a meta-search like for pics of cheap shopping results - anna.hoberg anna.hoberg Nov 3, 2013 Open resources are important but I agree that there has to be a well defined set of criteria that a student can access to determine their usefulness and reliability - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 I agree that openness is a key trend in European education and that we need innovative services (searching tools, curation etc.) especially targeted for teachers who do not have time and/or skills to locate and select the most appropriate open content/resources - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 This is a challenge in Norwegians schools as teachers still prefer all-in-one solutions.The development of open content will force teachers and learners to use and create their own learning paths. We need to develop a pedagogic that are adjustet to this to help the teachers. - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. This trend is certainly true for most adults, and many well-paying jobs literally can be done from anywhere that has a mobile Internet connection. It is also true for many of today’s school-age children, who live their lives in a state of constant connection to their peers, social groups, and family. While some decry the constant flow of information as a distraction or worse (with some justification), others see the opportunity to “flip” expectations about what is homework and what is schoolwork by taking advantage of those connections as learning opportunities. The implications for formal learning are profound, as flipping uses the resources on the Internet to free up valuable teacher classroom time, and fundamentally changes the teacher-student relationship. When students know how to use their network connections for more than texting, learning becomes much more serendipitous, opening the door to “just-in-time” learning, and “discovered” learning. The importance of project-based learning and inquiry learning cannot be understated in this context. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 agree- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 yes - another example of seamless learning :) - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 True!! - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 - Agree - Jean-Pierre.Berthet Jean-Pierre.Berthet Oct 31, 2013 agree, this is coming and school that don't take this into consideration will loose students who will find other ways to learn online - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Nov 1, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 agree, in my opinion this is the future and we should be prepared to take advantages of this - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013 Museums are more and more offering their share in providing learning opportunities with technologies. - tszmarta tszmarta Nov 3, 2013 Ooops, I am surprised that this thread has received just positive feedback. I strongly agree that the internet and new media offer us additional potential. But transfering the first sentence about adults and work contexts to schools make me think of an anarchistic education. We still discover new methods of making use of the internet but I hope to read about the limits in the upcoming challanges-section as well. - anna.hoberg anna.hoberg Nov 3, 2013
  • Social media is changing the way people interact, present ideas and information, and communicate. More than one billion people use Facebook regularly; other social media platforms extend those numbers to nearly one third of all people on the planet. Educators, students, and even the general public routinely use social media to share current events, opinions, and articles of interest. Likewise, scientists and researchers use social media to keep their communities informed of new developments. The fact that all of these various groups are using social media speaks to its effectiveness in engaging people. The impact of these changes in scholarly communication and on the credibility of information remains to be seen, but it is clear that social media has found significant traction in almost every education sector. It is not uncommon, for example, to see teachers using Facebook, Twitter, Google Hangouts, and other platforms to connect with their students. - agree: whether or not students use social media for school/learning purposes, the fact that most of them are using them privately already has a huge influence on their ways of interaction and communication - helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Again, the connection to curriculum and how such forms of collaborative/social learning are assessed for credit is important. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 agree- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 - agree - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 I agree - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 agree - Pieter.Swager Pieter.Swager Oct 31, 2013 agree - tszmarta tszmarta The potensial in social media has not yet been seen in education. When teachers or students can put together their own "spotify" list of OER and be connected to colleges or peers within themes their are interested in... - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based, and our notions of IT support are decentralized. The continuing acceptance and adoption of cloud-based applications and services is changing not only the ways we configure and use software and file storage, but also how we conceptualize those functions. It does not matter where our work is stored; what matters is that our information is accessible no matter where we are or what device we choose to use. Globally, in huge numbers, we are growing accustomed to a model of external image arrow-10x10.png software that is device independent. While some challenges still remain, specifically with notions of privacy and sovereignty, the promise of significant cost savings is an important driver in the search for solutions. Agree - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 agree- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 - agree - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 I agree - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 agree - Pieter.Swager Pieter.Swager Oct 31, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 2, 2013 agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013
  • Technology continues to profoundly affect the way we work, collaborate, communicate, and succeed. Increasingly, technology skills are critical to success in almost every arena, and those who are more facile with technology will advance while those without access or skills will not. The digital divide, once seen as a factor of wealth, is now seen as a factor of education: those who have the opportunity to learn technology skills are in a better position to obtain and make use of technology than those who do not. Evolving occupations, multiple careers, and an increasingly mobile workforce contribute to this trend. I would add the need for new profiles (professional) able to match pedagogical and technological skills so to design and develop the right learning solutions. So one the general side of citizens eskills are a critical factor, but new generations of professionals at the crossroad between technology, networking and pedagogy are also necessary- stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 Agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • There is a new emphasis in the classroom on more challenge based, active learning. Challenge Based Learning and similar methods foster more active learning experiences, both inside and outside the classroom. As technologies such as tablets and smartphones now have proven applications in schools, educators are leveraging these tools, which students already use, to connect the curriculum with real life issues. The active learning approaches are decidedly more student-centered, allowing them to take control of how they engage with a subject and to brainstorm and implement solutions to pressing local and global problems. The hope is that if learners can connect the course material with their own lives and their surrounding communities, then they will become more excited to learn and immerse themselves in the subject matter. Studies of challenge-based learning in practice, including two authored by the NMC, depict an increase in the uptake of 21st Century Skills among learners, including leadership and creativity. For challenge-based learning to achieve real traction, correspondence with curriculum is important. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013. And we need well prepared teachers for this. - guus guus Oct 30, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Oct 30, 2013 - Agree, Challenge Based Learning or Activity Based Learning can be strongly related to Flipped Classroom - Jean-Pierre.Berthet Jean-Pierre.Berthet Oct 31, 2013 we need to move from teacher centered to learner centered classrooms and technology can help us here. Connecting course material to authentic work is the key. - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Nov 1, 2013 Agree but for this to happen there needs to be a serious engagement by policy makers to ensure that teachers are developed / challenged to deign "Challenge based" learning environments. They need to be supported to understand what these learning environments are. How can they imagine an environment they themselves have never experienced?- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 The technology are giving new ways of colleboration in a deeper and better way - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013very much agree - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • There is an increasing interest in using new sources of data for personalizing the learning experience and for performance measurement. As learners participate in online activities, they leave a clear trail of analytics data that can be mined for insights. Learning analytics experiments and demonstration projects are currently examining ways to use data for enrichment. Dashboards filter this information so that student progress can be monitored in real time. As the field of learning analytics matures, the hope is that this information will enable continual improvement of learning outcomes. - agree- helga helga Oct 26, 2013 Agree, but questions of privacy and ethical use of data need attention a priori. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 yes - LOTS of work being done on learning analytics at the moment - and a fairly new conference series (LAK) - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 Learning analytics could be great, but it could also dumb-down education: as the idea behind LA is crunching numbers, then it is very likely that in some areas teachers and curriculum designers will increase the number of tests, MCQ etc. in order to feed-in the LA Moloch! What we certainly don't want to have the long tail of LA wagging the dog of learning! In a document SURF suggests to use LA to define which test items can best predict the final result in a test? (http://www.surf.nl/en/themas/InnovationinEducation/learninganalytics/Pages/default.aspx). This is not only self-referential, but the whole idea of Testing and Test-Driven Learning where SURF hopes to develop LA is one of the saddest avatars of pop behaviourist theory. Test-driven learning can only lead to subservient learners, kills creativity (you do only the things you need to do to pass the test) and initiative (ibid). It is the absolute killer of self-directed learning !!!! As Alfie Kohn writes in Punished by Rewards: "The more we try to measure, control, and pressure learning from without, the more we obstruct the tendencies of students to be actively involved and to participate in their own education. Not only does this result in a failure of students to absorb the cognitive agenda imparted by educators, but it also creates deleterious consequences for the affective agendas of schools [that is, how students feel about learning].... Externally imposed evaluations, goals, rewards, and pressures seem to create a style of teaching and learning that is antithetical to quality learning outcomes in school, that is, learning characterized by durability, depth, and integration." - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 Strongly agree, similar to testing regimes (the test tests what the test tests) , LA needs to be informed by learning science and not just what is easy to do- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013
  • The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured. This trend is being driven by the increasingly global and cooperative nature of business interactions facilitated by Internet technologies. The days of isolated desk jobs are disappearing, giving way to models in which teams work actively together to address issues too far-reaching or complex for a single worker to resolve alone. While this trend is not widespread, where schools have created a climate in which students, their peers, and their teachers are all working towards the same goals, where research is something open even to first year students, the results have shown tantalizing promise. Over the past few years, the emergence of a raft of new (and often free) tools has made collaboration easier than at any other point in history- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 The world of work sets trends for education in schools. There are noumerous topics, starting from entrepreneurship or collaboration to the point of career counceling that companies are interested in and what they shift successfully to schools. Judged from a positive perspective I think, students are being better and better prepaired for the job lifes. From a negative perspective I see that the world of work is starting with the beginning of school and allows less space for a free and natural self-development. I think that in times of demographic changes we will need a balanced procedure of both to look for future employability. - anna.hoberg anna.hoberg Nov 3, 2013
  • The nature of digital learning, from the design of the learning environment to how it is experienced by the teacher and individual student is changing radically. Team teaching. The role of the teacher as a sole practitioner is no longer viable, and there is a need to create the conditions for closer collaboration among teachers and for team teaching in many situations. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 - guus guus Oct 30, 2013 isn't this a variation on peer teaching/peer learning? - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 Super-sized classrooms are good examples of teachers working simultaneously in the same space http://www.teachingpersonnel.com/news/2012/7/5/head-teacher-expands-70-pupil-classes/. But collaboration should not be just among teachers, but among learners, the more experts coaching or mentoring the less experienced. http://www.soundout.org/teaching.html - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 Agree- nuria.desalvador nuria.desalvador Nov 2, 2013 Agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013- stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • The technological possibilities of using digital peer feedback online are increasing at a rapid pace. The ability to apply this powerful tool in learning also - Pieter.Swager Pieter.Swager Oct 30, 2013 . Peer feedback contributes to social reputation, social recognition and social identity construction. This happened long before digital technologies. What has changed is that it can now be made visible and all the metada generated through feedback can now be exploited to provide meta-feedback (social graphs, etc.). - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 Agree, but peer feedback needs careful training on it is time consuming on the part of the teacher. Effort should be put to make it sustainable using technology.- nuria.desalvador nuria.desalvador Nov 2, 2013 Agree- gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 3, 2013 [[user:Jeroen.Bottema|- vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013
  • Socio-economic and political trends mitigate against innovation and technology adoption. Schools don't operate in a bubble and are increasingly affected by outside forces, e.g. budget cuts, pay cuts, redundancies, raised age of retirement, use of low paid teaching assistants and unqualified personnel, support services libraries etc. closed. Political pressure towards autonomy, accountability, league tables, competition (leads to risk aversion). These trends can militate against innovation and technology adoption. The future may not be rosy! - roger.blamire roger.blamire Oct 30, 2013 I agree that these are real threats, but the main problem is not those threats, but the inability of subservient educators, parents and students to respond adequately to those challenges. After all, those decisions are taken by our representatives, not by some kind of Deus ex Machina! One of the roots of the inability to respond adequately is the transformation of citizens into consumers and teachers as service providers: school as a service! No, school is not just another service, it is the cradle of democracy. The inability to face and respond to those challenges would be the indicator of a failed school. The failure would have happened long before the budget cuts. - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013
  • Learning takes more and more place in different kinds of formal and informal networks. They may grow into communities of learning or communities of practice, disintegrate and form again. Participants have different kinds of roles in the networks and the roles can change. The basic feature of a network is that it’s not hierarchical and it’s not owned, so it’s inherently democratic and remains as long as you get as much as you give. Society of networks was a mega trend already 20 years ago, but its true meaning has changed through internet. Through social media networks have become a part of our every day life. Being flexible and quick, they're starting to play bigger and bigger role as one very important learning envirronment. - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013I don't think this is a new trend though - this has always been the case - communities of practice, rhizomatic learning, wildfire activities etc. etc. - it's just easier to do now that many people across the world are increasingly online - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 I'm working in this field at the moment, creating networks for teachers' continuous professional development, supporting sharing, building new knowledge, peer-to-peer learning, collaborating online in different kinds of virtual social networks, combining formal and informal. It's a new way of learning and has to be learned. We must learn to create networks, join them and collaborate in them. These all are skills that haven't so far been taught at schools. But they should. And this is and will be a key trend in education. - tiina.sarisalmi tiina.sarisalmi Oct 30, 2013 agree networks both for teachers and students are important. - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Nov 1, 2013 Agree - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 3, 2013 Agree - deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 Totally agree that networks will be a key trend in European education. In one recent JRC-IPTS report there is reference to the notion of networks of networks that is piloted in Japanese schools (http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC83503.pdf, e.g. p. 80) - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013
  • In a world where the information is available on almost every device, ideas are the crucial point of competitiveness. Creativity: If we look Google Play or Apple Store with almost 1.000.000 apps each, we will recognise the real meaning of having poor or brilliant ideas. - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013

New trends moved here from RQ 2:

  • The amount of data is increasing, making content curation a critical 21st century skill. - simon.drazic simon.drazic Oct 31, 2013 Curated Content: In XXI Century Education and around the web, content isn't king because appear Curation - new Social Media King - LucianeCurator LucianeCurator Oct 9, 2013 [Editor: This reads more like a trend and has been moved to RQ3]
  • Mobility and social networks are colliding, giving new perspectives on the concept of an "Anywhere School." I will suggest that we consider adding a combination of technologies consisting of ??? The perspective is called “The Anywhere Enterprise” in the private sector; see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJlNOmvoM0I . The trend is that our schools are moving to the cloud, students and teachers are bringing multiple mobile devices, and social networks like Facebook more and more are used in an educational context. Together these trends are game changers for the K12. - claus.gregersen claus.gregersen Oct 30, 2013 this links into the work on 'seamless learning' - see e.g. the UK Open University's Innovating Pedagogy 2013 report, pages 17-19.- elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 This is an important gamechanger in education since many students will choose other ways to learn and schools need to be aware of this. - ann.s.michaelsen ann.s.michaelsen Oct 31, 2013 - ikomninou ikomninou Nov 3, 2013 - Jeroen.Bottema Jeroen.Bottema Nov 3, 2013 - stefania.bocconi stefania.bocconi Nov 3, 2013 [Editor: This reads more like a trend and has been moved to RQ3]

Moved to RQ4 as Challenges:

  • There is a need for the re-design of physical spaces for learning in schools. Classrooms as we know them, with typical furnishings, are not ideal for the diverse of modes of learning now being discussed under the rubrics of personalised learning and/or collaborative learning. When devising ICT strategies or digital learning strategies at a school level (and we do not do this often enough), it is rare to see consideration being given to the physical spaces in which student and teachers will meet and interact. Investment in ICT infrastructure, virtual environments and digital content needs to be matched with imaginative interventions in interior design and furniture design for 21C learning spaces. - jimdevine jimdevine Oct 28, 2013 agree - stefania.aceto stefania.aceto Oct 30, 2013 yes - lots of work done/literature on learning spaces and also 'blended spaces' where we see a mix of the physical and digital - elizabeth.fitzgerald elizabeth.fitzgerald Oct 30, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Oct 30, 2013 - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 agree - Pieter.Swager Pieter.Swager Nov 2, 2013 . New physical spaces have to be flexible,adaptative and designed for group-working, co-design and creativity :http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uploaded_documents/JISClearningspaces.pdf and http://learninglabeducation.com/les-go/ - Jean-Pierre.Berthet Jean-Pierre.Berthet Oct 31, 2013 - gabriel.rubio.navarro gabriel.rubio.navarro Nov 2, 2013 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013Agree- deirdre.butler deirdre.butler Nov 3, 2013 Totally agree! See at the JRC-IPTS report (http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=6362) the case report of Hellerup School in Denmark, which has adapted the pedagogy and physical space (with a purpose built building with revolutionary design) based on students' needs to promote diversity, flexibility, creativity and to support a variety of learning strategies and styles. - Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Panagiotis.KAMPYLIS Nov 3, 2013
  • We need to treat schools as learning organizations. Pupils and students are moving (slowly) from the right column of the balance sheet to the left. In accounting, the left side of the balance sheet represents the assets while the costs and liabilities are on the right side. While there are discussions among enlightened businesses to put on the left side of the balance sheet the intellectual and social capital of their employees, pupils and students tend to remain in the costs and liabilities column. This has to change, and it has already started. How? Looking at the number of initiatives where learners are not just 'consumers' of knowledge, but where each child seizes the opportunity "to work out something specifically his own, which he may contribute to the common stock, while he, in turn, participates in the productions of others" (John Dewey, Moral Principles in Education). This is achievable through authentic learning, real science (not just repeating year after year the same exercises) addressing real world problems at each level of education. This is of course closely connected with treating schools as learning organisations, something started some time ago in business. - Serge Serge Oct 31, 2013 - anna.hoberg anna.hoberg Nov 3, 2013 We need to focus more on deeper learning and understanding. Today's school's are taking in to many themes in their subjects, there is no evidence on PISA results saying that schools with 60-80 themes within a subject are better than 18-20 - vibeke.klovstad vibeke.klovstad Nov 4, 2013 [Editor: MOVED TO RQ4 CHALLENGES and combined with a similar topic]